CQC Policies and Procedures

CQC and local authority compliant policies and procedures for new and established providers including care homes and dom care providers.

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Comprehensive CQC compliant policies and procedures to help with your new CQC registrations and on-going compliance

Save on time, resources and costs by buying in comprehensive CQC compliant policies and procedures with or without personalisation

Purchase key documentation or utilise our expert social care consultants to build policies and procedures that are bespoke to your organisation

We provide compliant policies and procedures for your care home or domiciliary care environment

SRG Care Consultant Limited are policy providers and we provide over 300 CQC compliant key policies and procedures to health providers & social care providers. Our team will also make sure your care service or health provider provides the best possible care for its residents and be CQC compliant. We provide these documents for new and established health providers. All of the documents and knowledge we provide aims to help pass your CQC inspections and secure new CQC registration.
Our policies fall into 4 groups. Administration such i.e information security, Health and Safety i.e as Lone Working, Human resources i.e Equal Opportunities and Service Delivery i.e service user development.

 

Some other examples include Falls Infection Control (Infection Control Policy), medicines policy, whistleblowing policy and a safety policy. We can also supply other documents in the care environment such as a Risk Assessment or even a checklist for care home.

What are care home policies, domiciliary care and supported living procedures?

A procedure describes the recommended steps or written instructions of a particular event and describes how the policy will be acted upon. The aim is to help prevent bad incidents from happening to persons and the care home resident. For example, a social media policy will provide step by step instructions on how social media can be used. These are in place to save time and effort trying to agree on a course of action. Using compliant documents helps care service staff in the workplace follow rules and keeps the residential care service premises CQC Compliant.

CQC Policies and Procedures

Policies, procedures and inspection for your care home or domiciliary care service

All health settings must comply with national standards. This means that a CQC inspector will review all necessary documents when they conduct their inspection. All services must have a quality management system in place which meets the required standards. All adult social care provider settings are actively monitored for continued compliance.

Documentation to pass CQC registration or improve compliance

Our documents are designed to support quality health setting including administration, human resources, management, catering and health & safety maintenance.

We provide bespoke documents that are unique to your business.

These documents will become yours, and we will provide you with a updating service through our legal division.

Alternatively we offer a full care compliant policy review of all your documents in place.

 

Our documents are written by experts in the CQC field including ex CQC inspectors and managers of health providers. All documents are compliant against the CQC Key Lines of Enquiry and will help enable your care service or health provider to run smoothly.

Features of  CQC Compliant policies and procedures for care homes, domiciliary care and supported living

  • Easy to use and compliant with CQC Regulated Adult Social Care Services
  • Available as a complete set or provided individually
  • All products comply with the Care Act 2014 legislation including Care Act 2014 impact statements
  • Suitable for all types of businesses or social care settings.
  • Provided in Word format which makes them accessible for any individual or company to use and for print publications
  • Procedures for Care Homes & Domiciliary Care Services, both packages are updated monthly.
  • New updates to the CQC documents are emailed to you to help keep up with compliance
  • Comply with the General Data Protection Act (GDPR), Equality Act, Asylum Act and Immigration Act
  • Can be personalised to your care service.
  • Dedicated Inhouse Policy team to help you and your care home staff team.
  • Helps keep standards of quality and protects people in care services
  • Inline with CQC’s Safe, Effective, compassionate, high-quality care principle.
  • Wide range of clinical procedures for nursing homes or social care settings.
  • We will work with the care service manager or care home owner to provide guidance on care home
  • Guidance about regulations for Adult Social Care Services

Why do you need document for your care home, domiciliary care or supported living service?

We are always updating and monitoring all developments with CQC compliance. If you have subscribed to our update service these documents will become readily available to you as soon as we update them. SRG Limited can help provide you with the relevant policies which can be tailored to the needs of your service.

What regulations do these documents meet?

All of the documents comply with the following regulations:

  • Heath and Social Care Act 2008 / Regulations 2014

  • Care Act 2014

  • Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2014

  • Fundamental Standards (Regulations) 2014

These policies are also in-line with the Health and Social Care sector within England. Keeping up to date documents are one of your legal requirements.

Our update service to help keep your care home or domiciliary care service within the legal requirements

Up-to-date policies will help keep your care setting compliant with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). Having out of date documents can result in fines or a complete shutdown of your care home / setting.

 

SRG Limited can help provide you with the relevant documents which can be tailored to the needs of your service. All of our policies are updated regularly through our policy update service.

Full list of CQC Compliant policies and procedures for care providers / care homes / domiciliary care services / supported living

Here are the full list of documents you need for your care home: We provide all of these at a special discounted price – get in touch with us via the contact form or call us on: 0330 133 0174. Please note this list may be incorrect as these documents are updated all of the time.

What's new and what are the new policy areas for 2024?

As you know CQC always like to make sure care homes and providers are keeping up to required standards. They have identified some areas where care homes and health providers may need help including:

Maintenance: Does your care home or health provider have the policies in place in regards to maintenance? i.e is broken equipment being reported and fixed?

Food and Allergies: Does your staff know what to do in an emergency if someone is fed something that they are allergic to? Are foods labeled with allergy information? Does your team approach caution when making meals.

Training: Do you have a policy which ensures your staff members only take on certain tasks if they are trained and competent?

GDPR: Is your data up to date and GDPR compliant?

Want to see an example policy?

We are currently offering the odd policy or document free of charge so if you would like one free policy (i.e diabetes policy sample or a policy for care) then feel free to visit our Request A Policy page and enter your details. We’ll then get back in touch with you with your free policy! We are also sharing with everyone our Covid file which is a dropbox full of documents relating to Covid 19

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What area does your policies cover?

A: We cover all areas within Health & Social Care, for all regulations and CQC compliance

Q: Do you bespoke your policies ?

A: We can do please contact us for more information

Q: Can you supply us with a Risk Assessment or Care Plan?

A: We certainly can, please contact us for more information.

Q: How do you send the policies and procedures for care homes?

A: We use a shared file that can be access by as many staff as you wish.

Q:  How do I keep an updated service on the policies?

A: We offer a monthly update service that covers changes in Compliance, Regulations and Law.

Q:  Can I share the CQC Compliant policies?

A: Yes we are happy for you to share the policies. You will have access to documents

Q: Do you have an index?

A: Yes please contact us and we can send. 

Q Will these cover the 5 CQC standards?

A: Yes the Policies are updated to meet the standards for social care services & wider care. 

 Q What will happen if your care provider is not compliant?
A: You could receive fines or a complete shutdown of your operation.

Q: Can you personalise the Policies and Procedures for care homes?

A: We can provide the policies and procedures with or without personalisation.

Q: Can you offer a full care compliant review of our policies and procedures?

A: Yes we can. Please get in touch with us.

Q: Do you supply documents relating to Infection Control ? 

A: Yes we do

 


Other frequently asked questions

Some of the key policies that the CQC may require include:

Safeguarding policy: This policy outlines procedures for protecting vulnerable individuals from abuse or harm, including protocols for identifying, reporting, and responding to safeguarding concerns.

Health and safety policy: Providers must have policies and procedures in place to ensure a safe environment for service users, staff, and visitors, including risk assessments, fire safety measures, and infection control protocols.

Complaints policy: This policy details how complaints from service users or their representatives will be handled, including procedures for investigation, resolution, and escalation if necessary.

Staff recruitment and training policy: Providers must have policies in place for recruiting, training, and supervising staff to ensure they have the necessary skills, qualifications, and competencies to deliver high-quality care.

Medication management policy: This policy outlines procedures for the safe storage, administration, and disposal of medications, including protocols for recording and monitoring medication use.

Data protection and confidentiality policy: Providers must have policies to ensure compliance with data protection laws and to safeguard the confidentiality and privacy of service users’ personal information.

Equality and diversity policy: This policy promotes equality of opportunity and diversity within the organisation and outlines procedures for addressing discrimination, harassment, and inequalities.

Governance and quality assurance policy: Providers must have mechanisms in place to monitor and evaluate the quality of care and to ensure compliance with regulatory standards, including processes for auditing, reviewing, and improving services.

These are just a few examples, and the specific policies required by the CQC may vary depending on the type of service provided and the needs of service users. It’s essential for providers to regularly review and update their policies to reflect changes in regulations, best practices, and the needs of service users.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) requires healthcare and social care providers to have various policies in place to ensure the safety, quality, and effectiveness of care services. Some of the key policies that the CQC may require include:

Safeguarding policy: This policy outlines procedures for protecting vulnerable individuals from abuse or harm, including protocols for identifying, reporting, and responding to safeguarding concerns.

Health and safety policy: Providers must have policies and procedures in place to ensure a safe environment for service users, staff, and visitors, including risk assessments, fire safety measures, and infection control protocols.

Complaints policy: This policy details how complaints from service users or their representatives will be handled, including procedures for investigation, resolution, and escalation if necessary.

Staff recruitment and training policy: Providers must have policies in place for recruiting, training, and supervising staff to ensure they have the necessary skills, qualifications, and competencies to deliver high-quality care.

Medication management policy: This policy outlines procedures for the safe storage, administration, and disposal of medications, including protocols for recording and monitoring medication use.

Data protection and confidentiality policy: Providers must have policies to ensure compliance with data protection laws and to safeguard the confidentiality and privacy of service users’ personal information.

Equality and diversity policy: This policy promotes equality of opportunity and diversity within the organisation and outlines procedures for addressing discrimination, harassment, and inequalities.

Governance and quality assurance policy: Providers must have mechanisms in place to monitor and evaluate the quality of care and to ensure compliance with regulatory standards, including processes for auditing, reviewing, and improving services.

These are just a few examples, and the specific policies required by the CQC may vary depending on the type of service provided and the needs of service users. It’s essential for providers to regularly review and update their policies to reflect changes in regulations, best practices, and the needs of service users.

Regulation 5 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 sets out requirements related to the fundamental standards of care that healthcare and social care providers in England must meet. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) uses these regulations to assess and monitor the quality of care provided by various healthcare and social care services.

Regulation 5 specifically focuses on the requirement for providers to have systems and processes in place to ensure that care and treatment are provided in a safe way. This regulation is crucial for ensuring the safety and well-being of service users and encompasses various aspects of safety within care settings.

Key elements covered under Regulation 5 may include:

Risk assessment: Providers must conduct comprehensive risk assessments to identify potential hazards and risks to the health and safety of service users, staff, and visitors. This includes assessing risks associated with the environment, equipment, and activities within the care setting.

Health and safety policies: Providers must have robust policies and procedures in place to promote a safe environment and mitigate identified risks. This includes protocols for infection control, fire safety, handling hazardous substances, and managing emergencies.

Staffing levels and competency: Providers must ensure that they have a sufficient number of suitably trained and competent staff to deliver safe care and treatment to service users. This involves ensuring that staff have the necessary skills, qualifications, and supervision to carry out their roles effectively.

Medication management: Providers must have systems in place to safely manage and administer medications to service users, including procedures for prescribing, dispensing, storing, and administering medications in accordance with best practice guidelines and legal requirements.

Incident reporting and learning: Providers must have processes for reporting and investigating incidents, accidents, and near misses within the care setting. This includes analysing the root causes of incidents to identify areas for improvement and implementing corrective actions to prevent recurrence.

Equipment and facilities: Providers must ensure that all equipment, facilities, and premises are safe and suitable for their intended purposes. This includes regular maintenance, testing, and inspection of equipment, as well as ensuring accessibility and comfort for service users.

Training and supervision: Providers must provide appropriate training, supervision, and support to staff to enable them to carry out their roles safely and effectively. This includes training on health and safety procedures, infection control measures, and handling of emergencies.

Overall, Regulation 5 aims to promote a culture of safety and continuous improvement within healthcare and social care settings, ensuring that service users receive care and treatment in an environment that prioritises their safety and well-being. Compliance with this regulation is essential for providers to meet the fundamental standards of care set out by the CQC.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) regulations are outlined in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. These regulations set out the fundamental standards of quality and safety that healthcare and social care providers in England must meet. Here is a list of the CQC regulations:

Regulation 4: Requirements relating to consent: Ensures that providers must obtain valid consent from service users before providing care or treatment, and that they respect the rights of individuals who lack capacity to make decisions.

Regulation 5: Requirements relating to the premises and equipment: Ensures that providers must have systems and processes in place to ensure that care and treatment are provided in a safe environment, including the maintenance and suitability of premises and equipment.

Regulation 9: Person-centred care: Requires providers to ensure that care and treatment are tailored to meet the needs and preferences of individual service users, taking into account their cultural, religious, and personal beliefs.

Regulation 12: Safe care and treatment: Ensures that providers must have systems and processes in place to protect service users from harm and abuse, including the safe administration of medications and the prevention of healthcare-associated infections.

Regulation 13: Safeguarding service users from abuse and improper treatment: Requires providers to have robust safeguarding policies and procedures in place to protect service users from abuse, neglect, and harm, and to report any concerns to the appropriate authorities.

Regulation 14: Meeting nutritional and hydration needs: Ensures that providers must ensure that service users receive adequate nutrition and hydration to maintain their health and well-being, including support with eating and drinking if necessary.

Regulation 15: Premises and equipment: Requires providers to ensure that their premises and equipment are clean, safe, and suitable for their intended purposes, including the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections.

Regulation 17: Good governance: Ensures that providers must have effective governance arrangements in place to monitor and improve the quality and safety of care, including robust systems for risk management, incident reporting, and learning from feedback.

Regulation 18: Staffing: Requires providers to ensure that they have sufficient numbers of suitably qualified and competent staff to meet the needs of service users, including appropriate training, supervision, and support.

Regulation 19: Fit and proper persons employed: Ensures that providers must ensure that all staff working in regulated activities are fit and proper persons to carry out their roles, including appropriate background checks and qualifications.

Regulation 20: Duty of candour: Requires providers to be open and transparent with service users and their families when things go wrong with their care or treatment, including providing an apology, explanation, and support.

Regulation 22: Staffing: support for staff: Requires providers to ensure that staff receive appropriate support, training, and supervision to enable them to carry out their roles effectively and safely.

Regulation 23: Quality of management: Ensures that providers must have effective leadership and management arrangements in place to ensure the quality and safety of care, including promoting a culture of openness, transparency, and continuous improvement.

These regulations form the basis for the CQC’s inspections and assessments of healthcare and social care providers, and compliance with these regulations is essential for ensuring that service users receive safe, effective, and high-quality care.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has established five key domains, often referred to as the “5 CQC standards,” which serve as the framework for assessing the quality and safety of healthcare and social care services. These domains cover various aspects of care provision and are used by the CQC during inspections and assessments to evaluate how well providers are meeting the fundamental standards of care. The five CQC standards are:

Safe: This standard focuses on ensuring that service users are protected from abuse and avoidable harm. It includes assessments of the safety and suitability of premises and equipment, as well as procedures for safeguarding service users from abuse, neglect, and other forms of harm. Providers must demonstrate that they have effective systems and processes in place to ensure the safety of service users, staff, and visitors.

Effective: This standard pertains to the effectiveness of care and treatment provided to service users. It involves assessing whether care is based on best practice guidelines, tailored to meet the individual needs and preferences of service users, and achieving positive outcomes. Providers must demonstrate that they deliver evidence-based, person-centered care that promotes the well-being and health outcomes of service users.

Caring: This standard focuses on the delivery of compassionate, respectful, and dignified care. It involves assessing the attitudes, behaviours, and interactions of staff towards service users, ensuring that care is provided with empathy, kindness, and consideration for the individual’s dignity and autonomy. Providers must foster a culture of compassion and respect within their organisation, promoting the emotional and psychological well-being of service users.

Responsive: This standard relates to the responsiveness of services to the individual needs and preferences of service users. It involves assessing whether services are flexible, accessible, and responsive to the changing needs and circumstances of service users, including timely access to care, support, and information. Providers must demonstrate that they engage with service users and their families, listen to their feedback, and adapt services accordingly to meet their evolving needs.

Well-led: This standard focuses on the leadership, governance, and management of the organisation. It involves assessing whether providers have effective leadership and management arrangements in place to ensure the quality and safety of care, promote a culture of openness and transparency, and drive continuous improvement. Providers must demonstrate strong governance structures, clear lines of accountability, and a commitment to learning from feedback and best practices.

These five CQC standards provide a comprehensive framework for evaluating the quality and safety of care provided by healthcare and social care services. Providers must demonstrate compliance with these standards to ensure that they meet the fundamental requirements for delivering high-quality care that promotes the well-being and safety of service users.

For care homes in England, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) enforces regulations to ensure the safety, quality, and effectiveness of care provided to residents. These regulations are outlined in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. Here’s a summary of the key CQC regulations for care homes:

Regulation 9: Person-centred care: Requires care homes to provide person-centred care that respects the individual needs, preferences, and dignity of residents. This includes involving residents in decisions about their care, promoting independence and choice, and respecting their cultural, religious, and personal beliefs.

Regulation 10: Dignity and respect: Ensures that care homes must treat residents with dignity and respect at all times, fostering an environment that promotes privacy, autonomy, and emotional well-being. This regulation covers aspects such as privacy during personal care, respectful communication, and protection from abuse or neglect.

Regulation 11: Need for consent: Requires care homes to obtain valid consent from residents before providing care or treatment, and to respect the rights of residents who lack capacity to make decisions. This includes ensuring that residents are fully informed about their care options and have the opportunity to express their preferences and concerns.

Regulation 12: Safe care and treatment: Ensures that care homes must have systems and processes in place to protect residents from harm and abuse, including the safe administration of medications, infection control measures, and risk assessments to mitigate potential hazards.

Regulation 13: Safeguarding service users from abuse and improper treatment: Requires care homes to have robust safeguarding policies and procedures in place to protect residents from abuse, neglect, and harm, and to report any concerns to the appropriate authorities.

Regulation 15: Premises and equipment: Ensures that care homes must ensure that their premises and equipment are clean, safe, and suitable for their intended purposes, including the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections.

Regulation 17: Good governance: Requires care homes to have effective governance arrangements in place to monitor and improve the quality and safety of care, including robust systems for risk management, incident reporting, and learning from feedback.

Regulation 18: Staffing: Ensures that care homes must have sufficient numbers of suitably qualified and competent staff to meet the needs of residents, including appropriate training, supervision, and support.

Regulation 19: Fit and proper persons employed: Requires care homes to ensure that all staff working in regulated activities are fit and proper persons to carry out their roles, including appropriate background checks and qualifications.

Regulation 23: Quality of management: Ensures that care homes must have effective leadership and management arrangements in place to ensure the quality and safety of care, including promoting a culture of openness, transparency, and continuous improvement.

These regulations form the basis for the CQC’s inspections and assessments of care homes, and compliance with these regulations is essential for ensuring that residents receive safe, effective, and high-quality care that promotes their well-being and dignity.

There are a total of 28 regulations in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014, which outline the fundamental standards of quality and safety that healthcare and social care providers in England must meet. These regulations cover a wide range of areas related to the provision of care and support, and they serve as the basis for the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) inspections and assessments of care providers. Each regulation addresses specific aspects of care delivery, governance, and safeguarding to ensure the well-being and safety of service users.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) requires healthcare and social care providers to meet specific health and safety requirements to ensure the safety and well-being of service users, staff, and visitors. While these requirements are encompassed within various regulations, here’s a breakdown of key health and safety aspects that the CQC typically assesses:

Risk Assessment: Providers must conduct comprehensive risk assessments to identify potential hazards and risks to health and safety within the care setting. This includes assessing risks associated with the environment, equipment, activities, and the specific needs of service users.

Premises and Equipment Safety: Care providers must ensure that their premises and equipment are safe, well-maintained, and suitable for their intended purposes. This involves regular inspections, maintenance, and testing to minimize the risk of accidents or harm to service users, staff, and visitors.

Infection Prevention and Control: Providers must have robust infection prevention and control measures in place to prevent the spread of infections within the care setting. This includes hand hygiene protocols, use of personal protective equipment, cleaning and disinfection procedures, and adherence to infection control guidelines.

Fire Safety: Care providers must have fire safety measures in place to protect service users, staff, and visitors in the event of a fire. This includes fire risk assessments, fire evacuation plans, fire safety training for staff, appropriate fire detection and alarm systems, and regular fire drills.

Medication Management: Providers must have procedures for the safe storage, handling, administration, and disposal of medications to minimize the risk of medication errors and adverse drug reactions. This includes ensuring that medications are stored securely, administered by trained staff, and documented accurately.

Health and Safety Policies and Procedures: Providers must have robust health and safety policies and procedures in place to promote a safe working environment and minimize risks to health and safety. This includes protocols for reporting accidents, incidents, and near misses, as well as procedures for managing emergencies and responding to health and safety concerns.

Staff Training and Competency: Care providers must ensure that staff receive appropriate training and supervision to carry out their roles safely and effectively. This includes training on health and safety procedures, infection control measures, fire safety protocols, and handling of emergencies.

Environmental Safety: Providers must ensure that the physical environment is safe and accessible for service users, staff, and visitors. This includes maintaining cleanliness, ensuring adequate lighting, minimizing trip hazards, and addressing any environmental risks that may pose a threat to health and safety.

Overall, compliance with these health and safety requirements is essential for care providers to meet the CQC’s standards and ensure the safety and well-being of everyone within the care setting. Failure to meet these requirements can result in enforcement action by the CQC, including warnings, fines, or suspension of services.

Policies in the context of healthcare and social care settings outline guidelines, protocols, and procedures for various aspects of care delivery, administration, and management. These policies help ensure consistency, quality, and safety in the provision of care. Here are some examples of policies commonly found in care settings:

Safeguarding Policy: This policy outlines procedures for protecting vulnerable individuals, such as children, older adults, or people with disabilities, from abuse, neglect, or harm. It includes protocols for identifying signs of abuse, reporting concerns to appropriate authorities, and implementing safeguarding measures.

Health and Safety Policy: This policy sets out procedures and responsibilities for maintaining a safe and healthy environment for service users, staff, and visitors. It covers risk assessments, accident reporting, fire safety measures, infection control protocols, and other health and safety practices.

Medication Management Policy: This policy details procedures for the safe handling, storage, administration, and disposal of medications within the care setting. It includes protocols for medication reconciliation, obtaining consent, documenting administration, and monitoring for adverse reactions.

Privacy and Confidentiality Policy: This policy outlines how confidential information about service users is handled, stored, and shared to protect their privacy and confidentiality rights. It includes procedures for obtaining consent for sharing information and measures to safeguard against unauthorized access or disclosure.

Complaints Handling Policy: This policy defines the process for addressing and resolving complaints from service users or their representatives. It includes procedures for receiving complaints, conducting investigations, providing feedback, and implementing corrective actions to address concerns.

Equality and Diversity Policy: This policy promotes equality of opportunity and diversity within the care setting, ensuring that all service users are treated fairly and without discrimination. It includes measures to prevent discrimination, promote inclusivity, and accommodate diverse needs and preferences.

Infection Control Policy: This policy outlines measures to prevent the spread of infections within the care setting, including hand hygiene practices, use of personal protective equipment, cleaning and disinfection protocols, and isolation procedures for infectious individuals.

Staff Recruitment and Training Policy: This policy defines procedures for recruiting, selecting, and training staff to ensure they have the necessary skills, qualifications, and competencies to deliver high-quality care. It includes protocols for background checks, induction training, ongoing professional development, and performance appraisal.

Risk Management Policy: This policy outlines procedures for identifying, assessing, and managing risks within the care setting to prevent accidents, injuries, or adverse events. It includes risk assessment tools, mitigation strategies, and monitoring mechanisms to minimize risks to service users and staff.

Emergency Response and Disaster Management Policy: This policy sets out procedures for responding to emergencies, such as medical emergencies, natural disasters, or security incidents, to ensure the safety and well-being of service users and staff. It includes evacuation plans, emergency contacts, and coordination with external agencies.

These are just a few examples of policies commonly found in care settings. The specific policies adopted may vary depending on the type of care provided, the needs of service users, and regulatory requirements. It’s essential for care providers to regularly review, update, and communicate these policies to ensure compliance and promote a culture of safety and quality in care delivery.

In the context of healthcare and social care, regulations refer to the laws, standards, and guidelines established by government bodies or regulatory agencies to ensure the safety, quality, and effectiveness of care services. These regulations set out the minimum requirements that care providers must meet to operate legally and maintain compliance with regulatory standards. Regulatory requirements are often enshrined in legislation, such as the Health and Social Care Act 2008 in the UK and are enforced by regulatory bodies such as the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

On the other hand, organisation policies and procedures are internal documents developed by individual care providers to translate regulatory requirements into practical guidelines and protocols for staff to follow in their day-to-day operations. These policies and procedures are tailored to the specific needs and circumstances of the organisation and its service users, and they outline how the organisation will comply with regulatory standards while delivering care services effectively.

If you are interested in policies and procedures, our contact details are:

0330 133 0174

 

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